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Sunflower Oils For MCT

Benefits of Sunflower Oil with CBD

Organic Sunflower Oil is in our products. Why is this?

All CBD tinctures require a carrier oil in order to deliver a usable product that can be absorbed by human tissues upon consumption.  Many brands, including HJB (Haylo’s exclusive brand), choose a MCT (medium chain triglyceride) oil for this purpose due to the many health benefits that MCT is believed to provide.  However, not all MCT oils are equal.  

In comparison to other major brands who use fractionated coconut oil as their source for MCT oil, Haylo Wellness’ CBD tinctures are formulated with organic sunflower oil.  Fractionated coconut oil can create a longer shelf life, but it’s also highly processed and non-organic. By bringing in sunflower oil into our product as your CBD’S MCT Oil, you get the benefit of additional vitamins. E, A, C & D! Sunflower oil also provides the benefit of both Omega 3 & Omega 6, key essential fatty acids, which help with the improvement of brain function. The powerful combination of these elements in, sunflower oil can provide a protective barrier in your brain from free-radical damage, while also giving you amino acids that help boost serotonin levels and alleviate stress!

The health benefits of sunflower oil include its ability to improve heart health, boost energy, strengthen the immune system, improve skin health, prevent cancer, lower cholesterol, protect against asthma, and reduce inflammation.

Lowers Cholesterol

Sunflower oil has no cholesterol, is low in saturated fats, rich in oleic and linoleic acids, and loaded with vitamins. All types of sunflower oil are an excellent source of vitamin E and provide a small amount of vitamin K. They do not contain cholesterol, protein, or sodium. By consuming sunflower oil, you also lower your risk of heart disease. 

Heart Health

Sunflower oil is rich in polyunsaturated fats, rather than monounsaturated fats that are found in other sources, such as olive, canola, peanut, and coconut oils.   Data has shown that people who replaced saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats have a reduced risk of heart disease than those who do not.

Four studies have compared the heart-health effects of a diet rich in conventional sunflower oil, a polyunsaturated fat, with a diet rich in canola oil, which has more monounsaturated fat. The researchers concluded that sunflower oil and canola oil had similar effects: Both reducing people’s levels of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, according to a 2013 review of those studies, published in the journal Nutrition Reviews. This last point confuses me as it seems to imply that there’s little to no difference between using polyunsaturated v monounsaturated fats in terms of the effect on one’s total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol….directly contradicting the first two sentences!   ….???

Immune System

Sunflower oil’s antioxidant properties strengthen the cell membranes, making it harder for bacteria and viruses to enter the body. In addition, this increases our ability to fight off infections.

Skin Care

Ever wondered about the benefits of sunflower seed oil? You’re not alone. First, a little history: the sunflower was cultivated by American Indian tribes circa 3,000 B.C. Tribes used parts of the sunflower plant to help soothe snakebites and to condition the skin and hair. When it comes to skincare today, sunflower seed oil is a great source of vitamin E, rich in nutrients and antioxidants, and is effective for combating skincare issues like acne, inflammation, general redness, and irritation of the skin.

 

Energy

The fatty acid content in sunflower oil is connected to energy levels in the body. Saturated fats can make you feel sluggish, while unsaturated fats, of which sunflower oil has many, can keep you feeling energized.

 

Anti-Cancer

As mentioned above, sunflower oil is rich in antioxidants and substances that act as antioxidants. Vitamin E, which has a group of compounds known as tocopherols, is a powerful antioxidant that can eliminate free radicals before they can mutate healthy cells into cancerous cells. 

 

Inflammation / Anxiety

Asthma affects millions of people around the world, and this respiratory condition can range from mild to life-threatening. Sunflower oil has been positively correlated with a lower amount and severity of asthma attacks because of its anti-inflammatory qualities, which are derived from its vitamin content, as well as the beneficial fatty acids it contains.

 

Prevents Infections

The oil exhibits antibacterial activity against C. Albicans, which is the most common cause of infections in people.

 

Article Sources

https://www.mamanatural.com/best-carrier-oil/

https://plantbasedhemp.com/sunflower-oil-based-cbd/

https://www.livescience.com/59893-which-cooking-oils-are-healthiest.html

https://www.livescience.com/52754-eating-heart-healthy-foods.html

https://www.newideafood.com.au/sunflower-oil-healthy

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4960740/

https://bucklersremedy.com/blogs/the-dirty/7-benefits-of-sunflower-seed-oil-for-your-skin

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/oils/sunflower-oil.html

 

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CBD & COPD

The American Lung Association Links COPD to be the third leading cause of death in the US.

What is COPD… Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is the progressing inflammation of lung disease that obstructs the air flow into the lungs — therefore making it hard to breathe.  COPD is also in association with the development of asthma, chronic bronchitis, pneumonia, and Emphysema.

When you have less of air flow in the airways, there is a lack of elasticity, and therefore more mucus is created thus causing clogging. Chronic bronchitis is what happens when the walls of the bronchial tubes because they think and inflamed, CBD helps with the reduction of inflammation. As to where in Emphysema, the walls which lay between the air sacs can be destroyed, therefore reducing airflow as well.

Causes of COPD are; cigarette smoke, second-hand smoke, air pollution, and exposure to dust and smoke. You can see the effects doing the following activities; walking, cooking, etc. simple task becomes more laborious.

Symptoms with COPD are; coughing large amounts of mucus, shortness of breath, wheezing and chest tightness. COPD usually found among middle-aged to older adults.

When having COPD, your risk for respiratory infections, heart problems, lung problems, lung cancer, high blood pressure, and depression are increased.

Findings: Effects of Cannabinoids and CBD on COPD

There can be a therapeutic beneficiary when using CBD, through many studies, CBD has been proven to help reduce inflammation and assisting in the inflamed airways to those with Chronic Bronchitis.

When CBD interacts with the CB1 & CB2 receptors, it is shown to reduce inflammation, among helping to create/maintain the homeostasis within the body. This activation of the receptors will help to reduce the airway inflammation. CBD also gives a potent anti-inflammatory agent in improving the lung function, even to a therapeutic level as a tool to treat many lung diseases.

Other research found is that cannabinoids found from cannabis can have amazing bronchodilators effects. Thus reducing the resistance in the respiratory airway and increasing airflow into the lungs. It can also be noted, that when CBD works with the CB1 receptor inhibits the contraction of the smooth muscle surrounding the lungs to dilate the bronchial tubes to open up more in the airways.

PLEASE NOTE: Smoking Cannabis can increase the acute and chronic bronchitis and irritate the lungs. It is especially heaving smoking, which can leave more obstruction. Instead, stick to other methods such as oils and edibles.

Recent Studies on Cannabinoids and CBD’s Effect on COPD

CBD has a potent anti-inflammatory effect and also improves lung function, suggesting it could be a useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.
Cannabidiol improves lung function and inflammation in mice submitted to LPS-induced acute lung injury.
(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25356537)

Cannabis has shown to be useful for treating inflammation.
Cannabinoids, endocannabinoids, and related analogs in inflammation.
(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2664885/)

References:

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